Wednesday, 13 July 2016

How to make a picture frame with no mitres

Picture frames are a regular for the woodworker. They make a great gift or quick project to add a nice touch around the home. But you don’t always have to go to the trouble of a full mitred joint. Sometimes a simple joint done well using a quality timber and well finished is all you need.  In this video George Vondriska from Woodworkers Guild of America shows us how to make a simple, frame with no mitres on the Triton TWX7 Workcentre. Be sure to check out the full and extensive online library of resources at  www.wwgoa.com

Thursday, 30 June 2016

Wooden Sled Maker – Marc Besnier


Our latest Master of Wood is Marc Besnier a craftsman whose business Au Fil Du Bois is based on a beautiful hill top in Ardecshe, Southern France.  Marc creates high performance dog sleds and wooden luges. Some are bespoke creations, fitted to the user’s size and weight, destined for use in the harshest sub-zero environments as a critical element of a polar expedition. Whilst the smaller luge can be seen in smart resorts across the Alps and beyond. Though many modern composite materials are available, the use of wood primarily Ash coupled with the skilled hands of a craftsman such as Marc still provides the high performance, durability and flexibility that is required when you are operating in the toughest conditions.




Monday, 6 June 2016

Woodworking Book Review; Building Sheds by Joseph Truini

Building Sheds by Joseph Truini

This week’s review is for a new book from the ever-popular stable of the Taunton Press, which has a great catalogue of woodworking and hobby titles to choose from. The first thing to understand here is the title and aim of the book. The term “shed” has slightly different meanings around the world. This can be a wooden building in the garden for storing the lawnmower and assorted household junk that can’t be accommodated anywhere else. Equally it’s a refuge from regular life gainfully employed as a workshop for making or fettling objects or small projects of all sorts. This book is very much aimed at the former, concentrating on the design and construction of a range of storage sheds, with some innovative features that make them easily adaptable to a range of uses.

This is a really well-illustrated book with a very hands-on style beginning with the basic principles of methods and materials. Keeping in mind that there are different rules and regulations around the world with regard to permitted development and building codes, there is a lot of ground covered here with good levels of detail. Getting a great foundation is important for any project so whether you need to put in frost-proof deep-level piles or a simple wood skid frame, this opening chapter gets you off to a great start. With sections on walls, cladding and roofing, the basic design and choices of materials are laid out with good images of most of the options. There is certainly enough information here to inspire you to design your own shed.

If, however, you want a bit more guidance in building a quality shed of your own, then there are five full projects to choose from where you can follow step-by-step guides from the foundation to the rooftop. Each project has illustrations with key timber dimensions as well as lots of photos of the entire build process. None of them look like a quick weekend project ­­-̶  in fact, a couple look substantial enough for a small family to live in. These are all achievable given sufficient time and budget. None of the projects requires a great number of specialist tools, although an impact driver, a circular saw and a nail gun are really going to take some of the pain out of it for you.


These are all pretty impressive structures that would be a really positive addition to your property. Some of the design features mean they not only look great but have some well-considered practicality built in. It would have been great to have a compiled cutting list and materials list consolidated for each project to make it easier to work out the budget. However, there are links to websites where the full plan can be viewed and purchased from third-party vendors who make these sheds commercially.

If you are planning or dreaming of building your own purpose-built stylish shed as your ideal workshop or garden store, then this book is well worth a browse. A serious case of shed envy is guaranteed.



Building Sheds by Joseph Truini is available from www.thegmcgroup.com and other retailers online.  ISBN 978-1-62710-770-9

Friday, 3 June 2016

Best of the Woodworking Web:Timber Furniture


It’s been a while since we shared a ‘Best of The Woodworking Web’ Post, so it’s that time again.

Meet Adam Magers, a skilled craftsman who believes we live in a world where a vast majority of the furniture is mass produced out of man-made materials with the intent of generating excessive profits.
In Adam’s experience, furniture like this doesn’t last and his passion for woodworking led him to start his business, Timber Furniture KC, where by taking time and care to craft furniture by hand that can stand the test of time.
For Adam, making furniture is more than just a job, it’s his passion.
Timber Furniture from Kindling on Vimeo.


Friday, 6 May 2016

Architectural Model-Making - Build a City on Your Workbench.

In March last year we shared an introduction to the team at Studio Hardie on our blog.

Charlie Palmer works as a project manager with William and the team, but also has an independent business - Charlie Palmer Models - which is based in the East Sussex county town of Lewes. Charlie Palmer Models provides architectural model-making services specialising in high quality context/off sight buildings.

We met up with Charlie to discover more about making professional architects’ models. With a background in ‘silversmithing’ and the many subsequent years spent running the workshop at Cockpit Arts, Charlie still has a big appetite for design-and-make projects, with an eye for detail and precision that’s required to deliver huge projects on a small scale.  

Thursday, 28 April 2016

How to build a Longboard

This is the next post from the amazing team at In’Bô in France, where they make really exciting products using innovative techniques fused with traditional materials.  

In this film we get to see the entire process from the construction of the laminated deck from layers of wood veneer, flax fibres and topped with their own marquetry deck.   To make such a high performance product you need to take real care in the storage and preparation of the wood. Temperature and humidity are critical factors in the preparation as is attention to detail in the finishing. The final product is very cool. 
Filmed in French this film has English subtitles.



See this earlier post for an introduction to the team at In’Bô http://blog.tritontools.com/2015/08/a-new-age-for-wood-meet-in-bo-cool.html
 If you are making your own high performance products with wood drop us a line  and you could feature here on the blog, leave a comment below or email Marketing@tritontools.com

Tuesday, 12 April 2016

Making space – meet the hackers and makers of Dallas

In previous posts we have talked to woodworkers and craftspeople about the rapidly growing interest in making stuff and being a ‘maker’. 

The stumbling block for many people in realising their vision is the lack of access to suitable resources such as tools or a space to work in. This is where a ‘makerspace’, sometimes called a ‘hackerspace’ or ‘fab lab’ comes in. A makerspace is a community of like-minded individuals who club together to create a facility that supports all members in their creative endeavours.
We visited the Dallas Makerspace in Texas, USA, to find out how such an organisation gets off the ground and just what makes their set-up - one of the largest such facilities in North America - so successful.  In short they have great membership bases who all contribute financially as well as sharing collaboratively in the running of projects. The community has grown to provide support for dozens of small enterprises and Kickstarter campaigns with great facilities, as well as sharing experiences with members and teaching new members.

If you are interested in working with wood, metal, plastics, or other creative arts, or if you would like to include 3D printing or laser CNC machines in your armoury, then working collaboratively is a great way forward. Alex Rhodes, a board member for the Dallas Makerspace, gives us an insight into their community in this short film.


If you have a collaborative ‘maker’ project, we’d love to hear from you, so why not drop us a line and share your experiences?